Early Book Review: Mason Jar Science: 40 Slimy, Squishy, Super-Cool Experiments; Capture Big Discoveries in a Jar, from the Magic of Chemistry and Physics to the Amazing Worlds of Earth Science and Biology by Jonathan Adolph

Mason Jar Science: 40 Slimy, Squishy, Super-Cool Experiments; Capture Big Discoveries in a Jar, from the Magic of Chemistry and Physics to the Amazing Worlds of Earth Science and Biology by Jonathan Adolph is currently scheduled for release on May 29 2018. Heatproof, transparent, and durable, the mason jar is a science lab just waiting to be discovered. Unlock its potential with 40 dynamic experiments for budding scientists ages 8 and up. Using just a jar and a few ordinary household items, children learn to create miniature clouds, tiny tornadoes, small stalactites, and, of course, great goo and super slime! With a little ingenuity, the jar can be converted into a lava lamp, a water prism, a balloon barometer, and a compass. Each fun-packed project offers small-scale ways to illustrate the big-picture principles of chemistry, botany, biology, physics, and more.

Mason Jar Science: 40 Slimy, Squishy, Super-Cool Experiments; Capture Big Discoveries in a Jar, from the Magic of Chemistry and Physics to the Amazing Worlds of Earth Science and Biology is a well organized book that not only offers interesting science experiments for children, but it also explores the science involved and encourages young scientists to use the scientific method and to take things to the next level, safely of course. I liked that most of the experiments can be done with things your are likely to already own, but are fairly inexpensive to gather if you need them. Some of the experiments are classics, ones that need to be included, suck as making rock candy, clay, and spectacular bubbles. But, the book also included some of the more trendy kitchen concoctions like slime. There were some that I have never seen, and some that were familiar but with some added or changed details to make it new. I think this would be a great resource for families with a science loving child (or more), those dreading a science fair, and libraries (including public, school, and classroom). I am now looking forward to the next school vacation so I can take my time and explore some of these with my own young scientists.
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