Book Review: The Book of Massively Epic Engineering Disasters: 33 Thrilling Experiments Based on History's Greatest Blunders by Sean Connolly

The Book of Massively Epic Engineering Disasters: 33 Thrilling Experiments Based on History's Greatest Blunders by Sean Connolly is a children's non fiction book that explores and explains some of the more interesting engineering blunders of the world. Ever wonder why Italy’s Leaning Tower of Pisa has been slowly toppling over for centuries? Stack books on a foundation of paper balls to learn about rickety building foundations and center of mass. How about the 15-foot-high tidal wave of molasses that tore through the streets of Boston in the Great Molasses Flood of 1919? Karate chop a full tube of toothpaste (outside!) to demonstrate the messy behavior of non-Newtonian fluids.

The Book of Massively Epic Engineering Disasters offers young (and adult) readers information and activities that bring that information home. It is an illustrated look at the physics and technology that makes up crumbling buildings, sinking ships, wobbly bridges, mud-stuck tanks, and so on. I like that the book covers well known engineering issues, like the Leaning Tower of Pisa and Titanic, but it also deals with lesser known mistakes like the  Fidnae Stadium collapse in ancient Rome. There are also  33 hands-on experiments to help readers see their new understanding and information in action.

The Book of Massively Epic Engineering Disasters will help Children and adults understand the science and concepts behind these mishaps and disasters while offering pathways to further information and research. This is a good book for use in schools, independent study, homeschooling, or simply reading by those that are interested in the information included. 
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